Online only contracts?
#11
berlinlife06 Wrote:With technology the way it is developing, many people use less paper constantly. But when you "buy" a domain, how can you prove in a court of law that you actually are the real owner? things can be changed and altered precisely because people are not using the paper anymore, and they are doing business without even ever meeting one another or speaking directly to one another...
The same way, I know of people that even have done business with others, going into somekind of "developing" partnership and they have never met personally or even use the phone to communicate.
In this I am very old fashion and don't trust easily. How much do you trust the internet as a media that protect your rights as a business person? For me, I need the face to face, and the actual signing of a contract in paper to feel things are "secure"... of course as always my partner laughs hysterically at my old fashion ways. What do you think about this?

I want it on paper. The initial contract can be done partly via e-communication but I need more to seal the deal. One thing that really impressed me with Go Daddy was that they called me after I signed up and keep in touch with me via new and "old-fashioned" means of communication.
Reply
#12
I agree with the cautions stated above.

For those doing business online, is there some kind of "signature" that's currently state of the art to verify a transaction similar to the signing of a contract?

I mean is there an accepted digital signature in use?
Reply
#13
I'm quite cautious and when it comes to contracts and that sort of thing I still want it on paper properly signed, you never know when you may need it.
Reply
#14
It's the same with me although I know that this mode of thought is quickly become outdated. Digital contracts just don't feel as real or secure as actual, physical ones.
Reply
#15
RFL1986 Wrote:It's the same with me although I know that this mode of thought is quickly become outdated. Digital contracts just don't feel as real or secure as actual, physical ones.

Has the law kept up to date with such things, do online contract carry the same weight if a case ever has to go to court, what sort of evidence would be needed to prove that there was a contract?
Reply
#16
jazzgrrl Wrote:I want it on paper. The initial contract can be done partly via e-communication but I need more to seal the deal. One thing that really impressed me with Go Daddy was that they called me after I signed up and keep in touch with me via new and "old-fashioned" means of communication.

IF you need paper then draw up a contract, stipulating that a digital signatures serves as acceptance, or, send the contract as a PDF.

The person you are doing business with will print out the PDF contract, sign it, and then fax it back to you. The actual paper with signature can be sent via snail mail. You can delay beginning any work associated with the contract until you get the original paper, with signature, in your snail mail.

Most companies that use contracts and do business online, will use this method of ensuring that signatures are on hand should there be any questions about the fulfillment of the contract.
Reply
#17
I didn't think of the PDF solution. It is the perfect way to deal with that and have still the "security" that the contract in paper makes you feel. At least for me it would feel better!
Reply
#18
berlinlife06 Wrote:I didn't think of the PDF solution. It is the perfect way to deal with that and have still the "security" that the contract in paper makes you feel. At least for me it would feel better!

I think many people forget about the PDF option. It can fill in the documentation gaps that may otherwise make long distance business agreements impossible.
Reply
#19
Faxes are a good option as well. As long as there is enough valid documentation then it makes things a lot more official and secure. I didn't think of PDFs before but I have used them before in contracts online.
Reply
#20
uff, is interesting
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)